Education

  • Sean Reardon

Leader: Sean Reardon

The purpose of the Education RG is to examine trends in the extent to which educational access and achievement are related to poverty and family background. The scholars working within this RG are examining state-level differences in the effects of social origins, uncovering the causes of the recent rise in the socioeconomic achievement gap, uncovering the causes of the yet more recent turnaround in this rise (among kindergarten children), and examining the ways in which high-achieving children from poor backgrounds can be induced to go to college. The following is a sampling of relevant CPI projects.

Reducing the race gap in test scores: How can the black-white gap in achievement test scores be eliminated? The new Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) will provide the most systematic evidence to date on the capacity of school-district policies to reduce the gap.

Colleges and rising income inequality: Are colleges delivering upward mobility for those raised in poverty? The new “Mobility Report Card” will provide unusually detailed data on this fundamental question.

Poverty and schooling on reservations: The noted ethnographer Martin Sánchez-Jankowski is examining how education on reservations can be reformed to reduce dropout, poverty, and suicide. 

Education - CPI Research

Title Author Media
Children of Immigration Carola Suárez-Orozco and Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco

Children of Immigration

Author: Carola Suárez-Orozco and Marcelo M. Suárez-Orozco
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Date:

Carola and Marcelo Suárez-Orozco, co-directors of the Harvard Immigration Project, have spent two decades researching and studying immigration. The result of their work and experiences, this book addresses how immigrant children fare in America. One fifth of all school-age children in America are children of immigrants (in New York City, the rate is 48 percent), and they speak over 100 languages. What thought has American society given to the special needs of these students? Have we done anything to accommodate them? What have they experienced? The answers to these and many other questions are woven together with moving accounts of immigrant children.

Parental Networks, Social Closure, and Mathematics Learning: A Test of Coleman's Social Capital Explanation of School Effects Morgan, Stephen L. and Aage B. Sorensen

Parental Networks, Social Closure, and Mathematics Learning: A Test of Coleman's Social Capital Explanation of School Effects

Author: Morgan, Stephen L. and Aage B. Sorensen
Publisher: American Sociological Review
Date:
Capital for College: Parental Assets and Postsecondary Schooling Dalton Conley

Capital for College: Parental Assets and Postsecondary Schooling

Author: Dalton Conley
Publisher:
Date:
IQ, Academic Performance, Environment, and Earnings Zax, Jeffrey S. and Daniel I. Rees

IQ, Academic Performance, Environment, and Earnings

Author: Zax, Jeffrey S. and Daniel I. Rees
Publisher: Review of Economics and Statistics
Date:
Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life Annette Lareau

Unequal Childhoods: Class, Race, and Family Life

Author: Annette Lareau
Publisher: University of California Press
Date:

education - CPI Affiliates

Daron Acemoglu's picture Daron Acemoglu Elizabeth and James Killian Professor of Economics
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Richard J. Murnane's picture Richard J. Murnane Juliana W. and William Foss Thompson Professor of Education and Society; Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research
Harvard University
Jennifer Hochschild's picture Jennifer Hochschild Henry LaBarre Jayne Professor of Government, Professor of African and African-American Studies
Harvard University - Kennedy School of Government
Robert Crosnoe's picture Robert Crosnoe Professor and Chair of Sociology
The University of Texas at Austin
Jerome Karabel's picture Jerome Karabel Professor of Sociology, Emeritus
University of California, Berkeley

Pages

Education - Other Research

Title Author Media
The Social Stratification of Theatre, Dance, and Cinema Attendance Tak Wing Chan and John H. Goldthorpe

The Social Stratification of Theatre, Dance, and Cinema Attendance

Author: Tak Wing Chan and John H. Goldthorpe
Publisher: Routledge
Date:

In current sociological literature the relationship between social inequality and patterns of cultural taste and consumption is the subject of a large and complex debate. In this paper the primary aim is to examine, in the light of empirical results from a research project in which the authors are presently engaged, three main, and rival, positions that have been taken up in this debate, here labelled as the ‘homology', the ‘individualization' and the ‘omnivore–univore' arguments. Elsewhere, we have concentrated on musical consumption in England, and find evidence that is broadly supportive of the omnivore–univore argument. Here we ask whether such findings are confirmed in the case of theatre, dance and cinema attendance. A secondary aim of the paper is to bring to the attention of practitioners in the field of cultural policy and administration the need to address the issues that arise through the use of more powerful methods of data analysis than those often applied in the past. We explain how indicators of theatre, dance and cinema attendance derived from the Arts in England survey of 2001 can be subject to analysis so as to reveal two distinctive patterns of attendance and, in turn, two distinctive types of consumer—who can, it turns out, be regarded as omnivores and univores, even if with some qualification. The former have relatively high rates of attendance at all kinds of the events covered, including musicals and pantomimes as well as plays and ballet, while the latter tend to be cinema-goers only, that is, non-consumers of theatre and dance. A range of measures of social inequality are then introduced into the authors' analyses, including separate measures of social class and social status and also of educational level and income, and it is further shown that, again in conformity with the omnivore–univore argument, these two types of consumer are socially stratified. Omnivores are of generally higher social status than univores and also have usually higher levels of education and higher income than do univores (the latter finding marking the main difference with musical consumption, which was unaffected by income once other stratification variables were controlled). In sum, our results for theatre, dance and cinema attendance lend, overall, further support to the omnivore–univore argument as against its rivals, but also indicate that different aspects of social inequality impact on different forms of cultural consumption in varying degrees and probably through largely separate processes.

Money, Morals, and Manners: The Culture of the French and the American Upper-Middle Class Michele Lamont

Money, Morals, and Manners: The Culture of the French and the American Upper-Middle Class

Author: Michele Lamont
Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
Date:
The Division of Labor in Society Emile Durkheim

The Division of Labor in Society

Author: Emile Durkheim
Publisher: The Free Press
Date:
The Time Divide: Work, Family, and Gender Inequality Jerry A. Jacobs and Kathleen Gerson

The Time Divide: Work, Family, and Gender Inequality

Author: Jerry A. Jacobs and Kathleen Gerson
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Date:
Classes in Contemporary Capitalism Nicos Poulantzas

Classes in Contemporary Capitalism

Author: Nicos Poulantzas
Publisher: Schocken Books
Date:

Education - Multimedia

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