Hispanic Trends

Leaders: David Grusky, Tomás Jiménez, Doug Massey, Beth Mattingly

This RG was created after the CPI received a sub-award to study Hispanic poverty, inequality, and mobility. The objective is to document key poverty and inequality trends, to begin the task of explaining what underlies them, and to then populate a new website, with the results coming out of this research.

We are taking on five lines of research under the leadership of both young and more distinguished scholars. The “basic trends” group is documenting key developments in Hispanic population distribution, income, education, poverty, employment, and “safety net” use; the “new generations” group is examining whether second and third generation immigrants are successfully incorporating into the labor market; the “social mobility” group is assessing whether Hispanics continue to have ample opportunities to improve their economic situation during their lifetime; the “social policy” group is examining how recent legal and policy changes have affected Hispanic natives and immigrants; and the “health” group is exploring the sources of deteriorating health among Hispanic immigrants and natives. The work of this RG was featured in a Pathways Magazine special report on poverty, inequality, and mobility among Hispanics.

 

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Hispanic Poverty & Inequality

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Doug Massey
David Grusky
Tomás Jiménez
Beth Mattingly

Social Capital and the Wages of Mexican Migrants: New Hypotheses and Tests

The Changing Geography of Mexican Immigration to the United States: 1910–1996

Vulnerable Populations and Transformative Law Teaching

The essays included in this volume began as presentations at the March 19–20, 2010 “Vulnerable Populations and Economic Realities” teaching conference organized and hosted by Golden Gate University School of Law and co-sponsored by the Society of American Law Teachers (SALT). That conference, generously funded by a grant from The Elfenworks Foundation, brought together law faculty, practitioners, and students to reexamine how issues of race, gender, sexual identity, nationality, disability, and generally—outsider status—are linked to poverty.

For Love or Money?

Citizenship, Democracy, and the Civic Reintegration of Criminal Offenders

The Size and Characteristics of the Unauthorized Migrant Population in the U.S

Liminal Legality: Salvadoran and Guatemalan Immigrants’ Lives in the United States

Illegal Migration from Mexico to the United States

In the Name of the Nation: Reflections on Nationalism and Patriotism

Circular, Invisible, and Ambiguous Migrants

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