Social Mobility

  • Gary Solon
  • Raj Chetty
  • Florencia Torche

Leaders: Raj Chetty, Gary Solon, Florencia Torche

The purpose of the Social Mobility RG is to develop and exploit new administrative sources for measuring mobility and the effects of policy on mobility out of poverty. This research group is doing so by (a) providing comprehensive analyses of intergenerational mobility based on linked administrative data from U.S. tax returns, W-2s, and other sources, and (b) developing a new infrastructure for monitoring social mobility, dubbed the American Opportunity Study, that is based on linking census and other administrative data. Here’s a sampling of projects:

Small place estimates: The Equal Opportunity Project, led by Raj Chetty, uses tax return data to monitor opportunities for mobility out of poverty. In one of the new lines of analysis coming out of this project, the first round of results at the level of “commuting zones” are being redone at a more detailed level (e.g., census block level), thus allowing for even better inferences about the effects of place.

The American Opportunity Study: This research group is also collaborating with the Census Bureau to develop a new infrastructure for monitoring mobility that treats linked decennial census data as the spine on which other administrative data are hung.

Colleges and rising income inequality: Where do poor children go to attend college? The “Mobility Report Card” will convey the joint distribution of parent and student incomes for every Title IV institution in the United States.

The “absolute mobility” of the poor: What fraction of poor children grow up to earn more than their parents? Have rates of absolute upward mobility changed over time? This project develops a new method of estimating rates of absolute mobility for the 1940-1984 birth cohorts.

Intergenerational elasticities in the U.S.: There remains some debate about the size of intergenerational elasticities in the U.S. A rarely-used sample of 1987 tax data provides new evidence on U.S. elasticities.

Mobility - CPI Research

Title Author Media
Classes in Capitalism and Pre-Capitalism Karl Marx

Classes in Capitalism and Pre-Capitalism

Author: Karl Marx
Publisher: Westview Press, Inc
Date:
The Dignity of Working Men Michele Lamont

The Dignity of Working Men

Author: Michele Lamont
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Date:
Don’t Put My Name on It”: Social Capital Activation and Job-Finding Assistance among the Black Urban Poor Sandra S. Smith

Don’t Put My Name on It”: Social Capital Activation and Job-Finding Assistance among the Black Urban Poor

Author: Sandra S. Smith
Publisher: American Journal of Sociology
Date:
Technical Change, Inequality, and the Labor Market Daron Acemoglu

Technical Change, Inequality, and the Labor Market

Author: Daron Acemoglu
Publisher: Journal of Economic Literature
Date:
Class, Crisis, and the State‎ Wright, Olin E.

Class, Crisis, and the State‎

Author: Wright, Olin E.
Publisher:
Date:

mobility - CPI Affiliates

Jonathan Kelley's picture Jonathan Kelley Director at International Survey Center; Adjunct Professor, Department of Sociology, University of Nevada, Reno
University of Nevada
Karl Ulrich Mayer's picture Karl Ulrich Mayer Stanley B. Resor Professor Emeritus of Sociology; Professor, Institution for Social and Policy Studies (ISPS); Director Emeritus, Max Planck Institute of Human Development
Yale University
Leo Goodman's picture Leo Goodman Professor of Sociology and Statistics; Member, National Academy of Sciences
University of California, Berkeley
Leslie McCall's picture Leslie McCall Presidential Professor of Sociology and Political Science; Associate Director, Stone Center on Socio-Economic Inequality; LIS Senior Scholar
City University of New York

Pages

Mobility - Other Research

Title Author Media
The Social Stratification of Theatre, Dance, and Cinema Attendance Tak Wing Chan and John H. Goldthorpe

The Social Stratification of Theatre, Dance, and Cinema Attendance

Author: Tak Wing Chan and John H. Goldthorpe
Publisher: Routledge
Date:

In current sociological literature the relationship between social inequality and patterns of cultural taste and consumption is the subject of a large and complex debate. In this paper the primary aim is to examine, in the light of empirical results from a research project in which the authors are presently engaged, three main, and rival, positions that have been taken up in this debate, here labelled as the ‘homology', the ‘individualization' and the ‘omnivore–univore' arguments. Elsewhere, we have concentrated on musical consumption in England, and find evidence that is broadly supportive of the omnivore–univore argument. Here we ask whether such findings are confirmed in the case of theatre, dance and cinema attendance. A secondary aim of the paper is to bring to the attention of practitioners in the field of cultural policy and administration the need to address the issues that arise through the use of more powerful methods of data analysis than those often applied in the past. We explain how indicators of theatre, dance and cinema attendance derived from the Arts in England survey of 2001 can be subject to analysis so as to reveal two distinctive patterns of attendance and, in turn, two distinctive types of consumer—who can, it turns out, be regarded as omnivores and univores, even if with some qualification. The former have relatively high rates of attendance at all kinds of the events covered, including musicals and pantomimes as well as plays and ballet, while the latter tend to be cinema-goers only, that is, non-consumers of theatre and dance. A range of measures of social inequality are then introduced into the authors' analyses, including separate measures of social class and social status and also of educational level and income, and it is further shown that, again in conformity with the omnivore–univore argument, these two types of consumer are socially stratified. Omnivores are of generally higher social status than univores and also have usually higher levels of education and higher income than do univores (the latter finding marking the main difference with musical consumption, which was unaffected by income once other stratification variables were controlled). In sum, our results for theatre, dance and cinema attendance lend, overall, further support to the omnivore–univore argument as against its rivals, but also indicate that different aspects of social inequality impact on different forms of cultural consumption in varying degrees and probably through largely separate processes.

Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being Daniel Kahneman and Alan Krueger

Developments in the Measurement of Subjective Well-Being

Author: Daniel Kahneman and Alan Krueger
Publisher:
Date:
Inequality and Growth Benabou, Roland

Inequality and Growth

Author: Benabou, Roland
Publisher: NBER Macroeconomics Annual
Date:
Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century Harry Braverman

Labor and Monopoly Capital: The Degradation of Work in the Twentieth Century

Author: Harry Braverman
Publisher: Monthly Review Press
Date:
Wage and Productivity Dispersion in United States Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment Timothy Dunne, Lucia Foster, John Haltiwanger,...

Wage and Productivity Dispersion in United States Manufacturing: The Role of Computer Investment

Author: Timothy Dunne, Lucia Foster, John Haltiwanger,...
Publisher: Journal of Labor Economics
Date:

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