Social Mobility

  • Gary Solon
  • Raj Chetty
  • Florencia Torche

Leaders: Raj Chetty, Gary Solon, Florencia Torche

The purpose of the Social Mobility RG is to develop and exploit new administrative sources for measuring mobility and the effects of policy on mobility out of poverty. This research group is doing so by (a) providing comprehensive analyses of intergenerational mobility based on linked administrative data from U.S. tax returns, W-2s, and other sources, and (b) developing a new infrastructure for monitoring social mobility, dubbed the American Opportunity Study, that is based on linking census and other administrative data. Here’s a sampling of projects:

Small place estimates: The Equal Opportunity Project, led by Raj Chetty, uses tax return data to monitor opportunities for mobility out of poverty. In one of the new lines of analysis coming out of this project, the first round of results at the level of “commuting zones” are being redone at a more detailed level (e.g., census block level), thus allowing for even better inferences about the effects of place.

The American Opportunity Study: This research group is also collaborating with the Census Bureau to develop a new infrastructure for monitoring mobility that treats linked decennial census data as the spine on which other administrative data are hung.

Colleges and rising income inequality: Where do poor children go to attend college? The “Mobility Report Card” will convey the joint distribution of parent and student incomes for every Title IV institution in the United States.

The “absolute mobility” of the poor: What fraction of poor children grow up to earn more than their parents? Have rates of absolute upward mobility changed over time? This project develops a new method of estimating rates of absolute mobility for the 1940-1984 birth cohorts.

Intergenerational elasticities in the U.S.: There remains some debate about the size of intergenerational elasticities in the U.S. A rarely-used sample of 1987 tax data provides new evidence on U.S. elasticities.

Mobility - CPI Research

Title Author Media
Family, the Lifecourse, and the Great Recession S. Philip Morgan, Erin Cumberworth, Christopher Wimer

Family, the Lifecourse, and the Great Recession

Author: S. Philip Morgan, Erin Cumberworth, Christopher Wimer
Publisher:
Date: 10/2012

The family is an important setting within which the Great Recession can exert its influence. Although the downturn directly affected many workers by reducing their earnings or forcing them into unemployment, it affected others indirectly by changing their living arrangements or family life. Further, the ways in which families are formed or broken up may be affected by the Great Recession, as it can alter the perceived costs and benefits of various family-relevant behaviors. Amid the turmoil and economic upheaval in the wider economy, individuals and families go about their lives, deciding to get married, suffering through breakups and divorces, planning families, and sorting out their living arrangements. The recession could have major effects on all of these family processes.

Income, Wealth and Debt and the Great Recession Timothy Smeeding

Income, Wealth and Debt and the Great Recession

Author: Timothy Smeeding
Publisher:
Date: 10/2012

The Great Depression is often cast as the beginning of the end for the late Gilded Age. Because it brought on the institutional reforms of the New Deal, it led to dramatic reductions in income inequality and set the stage for a long period of comparatively low inequality. The purpose of this recession brief is to ask whether the Great Recession, like the Great Depression, is likewise shaping up as a compressive event that will reverse some of the run-up in inequality of the so-called New Gilded Age. This question can be taken on by examining recent and long-term trends in wealth inequality, income inequality, median incomes, and debt.

How Class Works: Objective and Subjective Aspects of Class since the 1970s Michael Hout

How Class Works: Objective and Subjective Aspects of Class since the 1970s

Author: Michael Hout
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Date: 07/2008
Getting a Job: Is There a Motherhood Penalty? Shelley J. Correll, Stephen Benard, In Paik

Getting a Job: Is There a Motherhood Penalty?

Author: Shelley J. Correll, Stephen Benard, In Paik
Publisher: American Journal of Sociology
Date: 03/2007
Social Class and Earnings Inequality Kim A. Weeden, Young-Mi Kim, Matthew Di Carlo, David B. Grusky

Social Class and Earnings Inequality

Author: Kim A. Weeden, Young-Mi Kim, Matthew Di Carlo, David B. Grusky
Publisher: American Behavioral Scientist
Date: 01/2007

Mobility - CPI Affiliates

Jennie Brand Associate Professor UCLA
John Goldthorpe Emeritus Fellow, Sociology Nuffield College
Jonathan Kelley Professorial Fellow University of Melbourne
Karl Ulrich Mayer Professor of Sociology Yale University
Leo Goodman Professor of Sociology and Statistics; Member, National Academy of Sciences University of California, Berkeley

Pages

Mobility - Other Research

Title Author Media
Alienation and Social Class Karl Marx

Alienation and Social Class

Author: Karl Marx
Publisher: Westview Press
Date:
Uneven Tides: Rising Inequality in America

Uneven Tides: Rising Inequality in America

Author:
Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation
Date:
Social Mobility in Industrial Society Seymour Martin Lipset and Reinhard Bendix

Social Mobility in Industrial Society

Author: Seymour Martin Lipset and Reinhard Bendix
Publisher: Transaction Publishers
Date:
The System of Professions Andrew Abbott

The System of Professions

Author: Andrew Abbott
Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
Date:
Class, Status, and Power: Social Stratification in Comparative Perspective Reinhard Bendix, Seymour Martin Lipset

Class, Status, and Power: Social Stratification in Comparative Perspective

Author: Reinhard Bendix, Seymour Martin Lipset
Publisher: Routledge & Kegan Paul
Date:

Mobility - Multimedia

Sorry, but no media items exist for this research group.