Residential Segregation

  • Robert Mare
  • Daniel Lichter

Leader: Daniel Lichter, Robert Mare

The Residential Segregation RG is dedicated to updating the country’s system for measuring residential segregation. This research group has three main research commitments: (a) monitoring segregation at the extremes; (b) charting the spatial distribution of the elderly poor; and (c) developing a new GPS-based infrastructure for measuring segregation. 

Segregation at the extremes: The first line of research addresses the need to better monitor segregation at the extremes, including (a) the possible rise of enclave-style segregation at the very top (the “one percent”) and (b) the yet more troubling possibility of a resurgence of extreme segregation among the very poor. In a related recession brief, Robert Sampson has shown that poor neighborhoods have become yet poorer in the downturn, raising the possibility that hyper-segregation is indeed emerging. 

Segregation of the elderly poor: In the second line of research, research group members are charting the spatial distribution of the elderly poor, given emerging concerns about their ghettoization. This line of research, which is being carried out in collaboration with the Stanford Center on Longevity, begins with a simple descriptive mapping of elderly poor that reveals the extent to which they are indeed isolated and segregated. 

Real-time measures of segregation: The third main initiative is to develop a new infrastructure for monitoring segregation. The conventional approach of carrying out separate and static measurements of residential, school, work, friendship, and marriage segregation can be replaced with a direct behavioral framework that tracks the continuous-time patterning of inter-person contact. By exploiting GPS measurements (increasingly available, even for the poor, via mobile phones), it becomes possible to track poor, middle-class, and rich people as they move through their day and attend school, go to work, carry out their shopping, and visit friends and family. This methodology will produce a real-time measure of how much segregation there is and, in particular, the extent to which the poor are growing increasingly isolated in school, home, work, and leisure. 

Segregation - CPI Research

Title Author Media
Neighborhood Choice and Neighborhood Change Elizabeth Bruch, Robert Mare

Neighborhood Choice and Neighborhood Change

Author: Elizabeth Bruch, Robert Mare
Publisher: American Journal of Sociology
Date: 11/2006
Do Returns to Schooling Differ by Race and Ethnicity? Lisa Barrow, Cecilia Elena Rouse

Do Returns to Schooling Differ by Race and Ethnicity?

Author: Lisa Barrow, Cecilia Elena Rouse
Publisher: American Economic Review
Date: 05/2005
The Changing Geography of Mexican Immigration to the United States: 1910–1996 Jorge Durand, Douglas S. Massey, Charvet Fernando

The Changing Geography of Mexican Immigration to the United States: 1910–1996

Author: Jorge Durand, Douglas S. Massey, Charvet Fernando
Publisher: Social Science Quarterly
Date: 03/2000
American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass Massey, Douglas, Nancy Denton

American Apartheid: Segregation and the Making of the Underclass

Author: Massey, Douglas, Nancy Denton
Publisher: Cambridge: Harvard University Press
Date: 01/1993
Two Nations: Black and White, Separate, Hostile, Unequal Andrew Hacker

Two Nations: Black and White, Separate, Hostile, Unequal

Author: Andrew Hacker
Publisher: Scribner
Date:

Segregation - Other Research

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Segregation - Multimedia

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