Race, Ethnicity, and Immigration

  • C. Matthew Snipp
  • Tomas Jimenez
  • Linda Burton
  • Hazel Markus
  • Douglas Massey
  • Marybeth Mattingly

Leaders: Linda Burton, Tomás Jiménez, Hazel Markus, Douglas Massey, Marybeth Mattingly, C. Matthew Snipp

The CPI has an extensive research program on race, ethnicity, immigration, and poverty. The National Poverty Study, for example, is designed to rigorously compare differences across rural black, deindustrialized, reservation, and other “racialized” poverty forms. The CPI also runs a comprehensive program on Hispanic poverty that explores such topics as the “chilling effect” of anti-immigrant laws on program use, the reasons why, contrary to much speculation, the Hispanic poverty rate has not taken off, and the causes of the so-called Hispanic Health Paradox (see, for example, our Pathways Magazine special report on poverty, inequality, and mobility among Hispanics). And one of the CPI’s most distinguished affiliates, Jennifer Eberhardt (who is on the CPI directorate), is carrying out a groundbreaking big-data analysis of policing and race. We list below a sampling of other CPI projects on race, ethnicity, immigration, and poverty.

Poverty among refugees: The U.S. refugee population faces very high rates of poverty, yet we know very little about the effects of different resettlement programs and approaches. There are efforts afoot to exploit available administrative data and begin to find out what works and what doesn’t.

Arrests, race, and poverty: Why are some arrests resolved informally while others are converted into a criminal record that then has a life-long scarring effect? The process of converting an arrest into a criminal booking may play an important role in generating downstream racial disparities.

Reducing the race gap in test scores: The new Stanford Education Data Archive (SEDA) is a rich resource that is providing the most systematic evidence to date on the capacity of school-district policies to reduce the racial gap in test scores.

Poverty and schooling on reservations: Why are test scores and educational outcomes on Native reservations so low (relative to the national average)? In a new project by the noted ethnographer Martin Sánchez-Jankowski, we’ll be learning more about how traditional and formal education are viewed and the ways in which they might be better integrated. 

Race And Ethnicity - CPI Research

Title Author Media
Reducing Poverty in California...Permanently Conway Collis, David B. Grusky, Sara Kimberlin, Courtney Powers, Sandra Sanchez

Reducing Poverty in California...Permanently

Author: Conway Collis, David B. Grusky, Sara Kimberlin, Courtney Powers, Sandra Sanchez
Publisher: Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Date: 05/2015

What if we decided to go beyond the usual lip-service commitments to reducing poverty and actually tried to do something big? Learn more about a new plan to reduce poverty—substantially and permanently—in California.

The Waning Hispanic Health Paradox Francisco Riosmena, Elisabeth Root, Jamie Humphrey, Emily Steiner, Rebecca Stubbs

The Waning Hispanic Health Paradox

Author: Francisco Riosmena, Elisabeth Root, Jamie Humphrey, Emily Steiner, Rebecca Stubbs
Publisher: Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Date: 05/2015

It is well known that Hispanics have been more healthy than other groups in the U.S. with a similar socioeconomic position. Is this "Hispanic Health Paradox" alive and well?

Revisiting the "Americano Dream" Van C. Tran

Revisiting the "Americano Dream"

Author: Van C. Tran
Publisher: Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Date: 05/2015

Is Latino assimilation stalling out because of the recent recession, rising deportation rates, and the growing popularity of rural destinations?

The “Chilling Effect” of America’s New Immigration Enforcement Regime Francisco I. Pedraza, Ling Zhu

The “Chilling Effect” of America’s New Immigration Enforcement Regime

Author: Francisco I. Pedraza, Ling Zhu
Publisher: Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Date: 05/2015

Are TANF enrollments declining because Hispanic immigrants are afraid that enrollment will lead to deportation?

The Real Hispanic Challenge Douglas S. Massey

The Real Hispanic Challenge

Author: Douglas S. Massey
Publisher: Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality
Date: 05/2015

The simple aim of recent immigration and border policy: Reduce the inflow of undocumented migrants. Has the policy worked? Were there unanticipated consequences?

race and ethnicity - CPI Affiliates

Stephen Small's picture Stephen Small Associate Professor, African American Studies and African Diaspora Studies
University of California, Berkeley
Suzanne Model's picture Suzanne Model Professor Emerita, Department of Sociology; Research Associate, Center for Research on International Migration, University of California at Irvine
University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Thomas J. Espenshade's picture Thomas J. Espenshade Professor of Sociology, Emeritus; Faculty Associate, Office of Population Research
Princeton University
Victor Nee's picture Victor Nee Frank and Rosa Rhodes Professor of Sociology; Director of the Center for the Study of Economy and Society
Cornell University
William T. Bielby Professor of Sociology
University of Illinois-Chicago

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Race And Ethnicity - Other Research

Title Author Media
Medical Mistrust, Perceived Discrimination, and Satisfaction With Health Care Among Young-Adult Rural Latinos Daniel F. López-Cevallos, S. Marie Harvey, Jocelyn T. Warren

Medical Mistrust, Perceived Discrimination, and Satisfaction With Health Care Among Young-Adult Rural Latinos

Author: Daniel F. López-Cevallos, S. Marie Harvey, Jocelyn T. Warren
Publisher: The Journal of Rural Health
Date: 02/2014

Little research has analyzed mistrust and discrimination influencing receipt of health care services among Latinos, particularly those living in rural areas. This study examined the associations between medical mistrust, perceived discrimination, and satisfaction with health care among young-adult rural Latinos.

Residential Hierarchy in Los Angeles: An Examination of Ethnic and Documentation Status Differences David A. Cort, Ken-Hou Lin, Gabriela Stevenson

Residential Hierarchy in Los Angeles: An Examination of Ethnic and Documentation Status Differences

Author: David A. Cort, Ken-Hou Lin, Gabriela Stevenson
Publisher: Social Science Research
Date: 01/2014

Longitudinal event history data from two waves of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey are used to explore racial, ethnic, and documentation status differences in access to desirable neighborhoods. We first find that contrary to recent findings, undocumented Latinos do not replace blacks at the bottom of the locational attainment hierarchy. Whites continue to end up in neighborhoods that are less poor and whiter than minority groups, while all minorities, including undocumented Latinos, end up in neighborhoods that are of similar quality. Second, the effects of socioeconomic status for undocumented Latinos are either similar to or weaker than disadvantaged blacks. These findings suggest that living in less desirable neighborhoods is a fate disproportionately borne by non-white Los Angeles residents and that in some limited ways, the penalty attached to being undocumented Latino might actually be greater than the penalty attached to being black.

Are Latino Immigrants a Burden to Safety Net Services in Non-Traditional Immigrant States? Lessons from Oregon Daniel López-Cevallos

Are Latino Immigrants a Burden to Safety Net Services in Non-Traditional Immigrant States? Lessons from Oregon

Author: Daniel López-Cevallos
Publisher: American Journal of Public Health
Date: 12/2013

The significant growth of the Latino population in the midst of an economic recession has invigorated anti-Latino, anti-immigrant sentiments in many US states. One common misconception is that Latino immigrants are a burden to safety net services. This may be particularly true in nontraditional immigrant states that have not historically served Latino immigrants. Oregon data suggest that despite a higher prevalence of poverty, use of safety net services among Latino immigrants in Oregon is lower than that among non-Latino Whites. Immigration status, costs, lack of insurance coverage, and discrimination are among the reasons for this group’s limited use of services. Nevertheless, policies designed to strengthen community and institutional support for Latino immigrant families should be considered in the context of current health care and immigration reform efforts.

When the Border Is “Everywhere”: State-level Variation in Migration Control and Changing Settlement Patterns of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population in the United States Arjen Leerkes, James D. Bachmeier, Mark A. Leach

When the Border Is “Everywhere”: State-level Variation in Migration Control and Changing Settlement Patterns of the Unauthorized Immigrant Population in the United States

Author: Arjen Leerkes, James D. Bachmeier, Mark A. Leach
Publisher: International Migration Review
Date: 12/2013

Governments increasingly exclude unauthorized migrants from labor markets and public provisions and apprehend those who have settled in the territory. In the U.S., recent increases in interior control coincided with a reduction in (the growth of) the estimated unauthorized population. This study describes the mechanisms through which interior control may impact migration patterns and analyzes whether interior control has been responsible for the changing settlement patterns. We find that when the effects of labor markets and internal dynamics of migration processes are controlled, policy has a (moderate) negative effect on estimated levels of unauthorized residence, both in individual states and the U.S. as a whole.

See No Spanish: Language, Local Context, and Attitudes Toward Immigration Daniel J. Hopkins, Van C. Tran, Abigail Fisher Williamson

See No Spanish: Language, Local Context, and Attitudes Toward Immigration

Author: Daniel J. Hopkins, Van C. Tran, Abigail Fisher Williamson
Publisher: Politics, Groups, and Identities
Date: 07/2013

Explanations of Americans’ attitudes toward immigration emphasize threats to national identity and culture. However, we do not know the specific sources of cultural threat or whether theyoperate locally. Native-born residents commonly voice concerns about the prevalence of Spanish, suggesting that foreign languages might be one such source of threat. This articleuses survey experiments to provide one of the first causal tests of the impact of written Spanish on Americans’ immigration attitudes. One experiment (N = 351) was conducted online with a nationally representative sample, while a second was embedded in an exit poll (N = 902). The experiments show that Spanish has differential impacts depending on Americans’ prior contact with it. Among those who hear Spanish frequently in day-to-daylife, seeing written Spanish induces anti-immigration attitudes. These findings suggest that language can foster cultural threat, and they highlight a mechanism through which local encounters can be threatening.

Race And Ethnicity - Multimedia

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