Residential Segregation

  • Robert Mare
  • Daniel Lichter

Leader: Daniel Lichter, Robert Mare

The Residential Segregation RG is dedicated to updating the country’s system for measuring residential segregation. This research group has three main research commitments: (a) monitoring segregation at the extremes; (b) charting the spatial distribution of the elderly poor; and (c) developing a new GPS-based infrastructure for measuring segregation. 

Segregation at the extremes: The first line of research addresses the need to better monitor segregation at the extremes, including (a) the possible rise of enclave-style segregation at the very top (the “one percent”) and (b) the yet more troubling possibility of a resurgence of extreme segregation among the very poor. In a related recession brief, Robert Sampson has shown that poor neighborhoods have become yet poorer in the downturn, raising the possibility that hyper-segregation is indeed emerging. 

Segregation of the elderly poor: In the second line of research, research group members are charting the spatial distribution of the elderly poor, given emerging concerns about their ghettoization. This line of research, which is being carried out in collaboration with the Stanford Center on Longevity, begins with a simple descriptive mapping of elderly poor that reveals the extent to which they are indeed isolated and segregated. 

Real-time measures of segregation: The third main initiative is to develop a new infrastructure for monitoring segregation. The conventional approach of carrying out separate and static measurements of residential, school, work, friendship, and marriage segregation can be replaced with a direct behavioral framework that tracks the continuous-time patterning of inter-person contact. By exploiting GPS measurements (increasingly available, even for the poor, via mobile phones), it becomes possible to track poor, middle-class, and rich people as they move through their day and attend school, go to work, carry out their shopping, and visit friends and family. This methodology will produce a real-time measure of how much segregation there is and, in particular, the extent to which the poor are growing increasingly isolated in school, home, work, and leisure. 

Segregation - CPI Research

Title Author Media
60 Years After Brown: Trends and Consequences of School Segregation Sean F. Reardon, Ann Owens

60 Years After Brown: Trends and Consequences of School Segregation

Author: Sean F. Reardon, Ann Owens
Publisher:
Date: 07/2014

Since the Supreme Court's 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision, researchers and policy makers have paid close attention to trends in school segregation. Here we review the evidence regarding trends and consequences of both racial and economic school segregation sinceBrown. The evidence suggests that the most significant declines in black-white school segregation occurred in the late 1960s and early 1970s. There is disagreement about the direction of more recent trends in racial segregation, largely driven by how one defines and measures segregation. Depending on the definition used, segregation has either increased substantially or changed little, although there are important differences in the trends across regions, racial groups, and institutional levels. Limited evidence on school economic segregation makes documenting trends difficult, but students appear to be more segregated by income across schools and districts today than in 1990. We also discuss the role of desegregation litigation, demographic changes, and residential segregation in shaping trends in both racial and economic segregation. We develop a general conceptual model of how and why school segregation might affect students and review the relatively thin body of empirical evidence that explicitly assesses the consequences of school segregation. We conclude with a discussion of aspects of school segregation on which further research is needed.

Income Inequality and Income Segregation Sean F. Reardon, Kendra Bischoff

Income Inequality and Income Segregation

Author: Sean F. Reardon, Kendra Bischoff
Publisher:
Date: 07/2010

Both income inequality and income segregation in the United States grew substantially from 1970 to 2000. Using data from the 100 largest metropolitan areas, we investigate whether and how income inequality affects patterns of income segregation along three dimensions—the spatial concentration of poverty and affluence; race-specific patterns of income segregation; and the geographic scale of income segregation. We find a robust relationship between income inequality and income segregation, an effect that is larger for black families than for white families. In addition, income inequality affects income segregation primarily through its effect on the large-scale spatial concentration of affluence, rather than by affecting the spatial concentration of poverty or by altering small-scale patterns of income segregation.

Racial, Educational and Religious Endogamy in the United States: A Comparative Historical Perspective Michael J. Rosenfeld

Racial, Educational and Religious Endogamy in the United States: A Comparative Historical Perspective

Author: Michael J. Rosenfeld
Publisher: Social Forces
Date: 09/2008
Neighborhood Effects on Economic Self-Sufficiency: A Reconsideration of the Moving to Opportunity Experiment Clampet-Lundquist Susan, Douglas S. Massey

Neighborhood Effects on Economic Self-Sufficiency: A Reconsideration of the Moving to Opportunity Experiment

Author: Clampet-Lundquist Susan, Douglas S. Massey
Publisher: American Journal of Sociology
Date: 07/2008
Social Boundaries and Marital Assimilation: Interpreting Trends in Racial and Ethnic Intermarriage Zhenchao Qian, Daniel T. Lichter

Social Boundaries and Marital Assimilation: Interpreting Trends in Racial and Ethnic Intermarriage

Author: Zhenchao Qian, Daniel T. Lichter
Publisher: American Sociological Review
Date: 02/2007

Segregation - CPI Affiliates

Magnus Nermo Assistant Professor of Sociology Stockholm University
Michael Sobel Professor Columbia University
Nan Dirk De Graaf Professor Radboud University, Nijmegen
Nancy Denton Professor of Demography State University of New York - University at Albany
Thomas J. Espenshade Professor of Sociology; Faculty Associate, Office of Population Research Princeton University

Pages

Segregation - Other Research

Title Author Media
Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City Elijah Anderson

Code of the Street: Decency, Violence, and the Moral Life of the Inner City

Author: Elijah Anderson
Publisher: W.W. Norton & Company
Date:
Tally's Corner: A Study of Negro Streetcorner Men Elliot Liebow

Tally's Corner: A Study of Negro Streetcorner Men

Author: Elliot Liebow
Publisher: Little, Brown and Company
Date:

Segregation - Multimedia

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