CPI Research

The persistence of affluence is stronger for whites, while the persistence of poverty is stronger for blacks. However, beginning with generations that came of age in the mid-1960s, the white-black gap in the chance of escaping poverty has closed significantly.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Florencia Torche

Why should we care about wealth? It serves an insurance function by protecting against economic shocks, health and personal crises, and mishaps. It brings access to quality health care, educational opportunities, better-resourced communities, and other services.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Thomas Shapiro

Between 1970 and 2010, the earnings gap between whites and other groups has narrowed, but most of that decline was secured in the immediate aftermath of the Civil Rights Movement.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Colin Peterson, C. Matthew Snipp, Sin Yi Cheung

Racial and ethnic minorities experience higher-than-average rates of illness, have higher age-specific death rates throughout the life course, and are more likely to suffer from early onset of illnesses and more severe diseases than whites.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Rucker C. Johnson

Despite observed declines in crime and much talk of criminal justice reform, the United States continues to incarcerate a much larger fraction of its population than any other advanced industrialized country.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Becky Pettit, Bryan Sykes

Between 1990 and 2015, average academic performance improved for students of all racial and ethnic groups, but grew fastest among black and Hispanic students.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Sean F. Reardon, Erin M. Fahle
Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Matthew Desmond

Given that poverty rates are signicantly higher among blacks, Hispanics, and American Indians than in the general population, it is not surprising that their enrollment in federal safety net programs, such as Medicaid and food stamps, is also higher.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Mark Duggan, Valerie Scimeca

Though some gaps have narrowed, there remain substantial racial-ethnic differences in poverty, with blacks and Native Americans continuing to experience the highest poverty rates, Hispanics following with slightly lower rates, and whites and Asians experiencing the lowest poverty rates.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Linda M. Burton, Marybeth Mattingly, Juan Pedroza, Whitney Welsh

Full recovery from the job losses of the Great Recession eluded African-American men even as the rest of the population approached full employment. Job loss can also unsettle those who haven’t lost their jobs.

Date:
June, 2017
Author:
Michael Hout

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